The Return of the Stoma

I wrote my last post the day of Zack’s hospitalization before everything went kerflooey.  I had no idea what was about to happen….and now, the rest of the story.

We knew it was too good to last.  A fun summer full of tennis, swimming, running around like crazy, jumping on trampolines, riding bikes and water balloon fights.  We packed a lot into the three weeks after school ended.  I am so glad that Jim and I had been trying to let Zack do as many fun things as possible for as long as he could because last Monday all that changed.

Our day started out like any ordinary summer day.  Tennis lessons in the morning, playing outside with friends and getting new library books.  Sigh.  That afternoon, Zack wanted to ride his bike around the cul-de-sac.  I was happy about that because my neighbors were outside and it is always fun to chat with grown-ups.  Soon after getting on his bike Zack came back and started crying in pain.  Sure enough, his stoma was prolapsing.

Prolapsing stomas do not scare me.  We are used to them around here.  Zack crying in pain DOES scare me.  I carried him inside and got a good look at his stoma which was unusually bloody and painful.  Soon it started to look a bit purplish, which in stoma world is not a good thing.  I texted his GI doctor and tried not to let Zack know I was beginning to get worried.  Then Zack said two dreaded things.  First, I feel sick. Second, Take me to 3 West (the pediatric ward at our hospital).

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I started packing a bag for Zack and for me and Jim walked in the door.  He quickly agreed that we needed to head to the hospital and off we went.  Our GI doctor called ahead to the emergency room to let them know we were coming.  I was thankful for that because Zack was super nauseous and could not walk by then.  Soon after arriving, our surgeon came in and explained that he was going to try to reduce Zack’s stoma in the trauma room while Z was under conscious sedation.  We were able to be in the room with him the whole time.  Despite his surgeon’s best efforts, Zack’s stoma was not cooperating and he told us that the next step was to try to reduce it in the OR and if that failed he would need surgery.  He felt that surgery was likely.  I told him I was hopeful the reduction would work.

I was wrong.  After a valiant effort, Zack’s surgeon came to see us in the waiting room around 12:30 to give us the bad news.  Zack needed surgery and he felt he needed to open his abdomen again because he was worried about damage to the intestines and wanted to make sure they were OK.  Three hours later, the surgery was done.  Zack had to have 6″ of his intestines removed and a new ileostomy placed.  The surgeon was glad he opened Zack’s belly because he discovered a hole in Zack’s intestines that he would have missed otherwise.

Zack went to the PICU to recover and for pain control.  Until recently, Zack’s pattern with surgery is to have pretty intense pain afterward.  We have had to stay in the hospital longer than expected numerous times.  This time Zack was in the PICU for a day and a half and then moved to the ward.  He had pain, of course, but it was well-managed with a PCA of Dilaudid and Toradol.  Our doctor told us he would need to remain in the hospital to finish a 72 hour course of IV antibiotics because of his messy abdomen.

For Zack, going to the ward is a happy thing.  He knows all of the nurses and medics and most importantly, feels safe and loved there.  Once he was all tucked into his new bed, our social worker stopped by to see if she could cheer Zack.  Before we knew it, there was a shaving cream fiesta happening.  They put shaving cream on the window and finger painted.  Zack put shaving cream on our social worker, medic and several nurses.  Even our PICU nurses got in on the action.  It was really fun!  Zack was still pretty darn tired, so he sat in a chair unable to really lift his head.  Here are some pictures:

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Sometimes being in the hospital can be fun(ish)!

The next few days were spent healing and getting stronger.  Zack knows the hospital game now and tends to say he feels fine so that he can get off his pain button and out of the hospital.  Everyone knows he is always “awesome”.  This time he tried to fake out the nurses with his pain number.  You know, how would you rate your pain 1-10?  He told one of the nurses his pain was zero.  I did not hear what he said, so I asked him once the nurse left.  Zack told me he told our nurse his pain was zero, but “for you mom, the pain is really a two.”  Stinker.

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So now what?  No. Really.  Now what?  Someone please tell us what to do.

We know that Zack’s body does not have any internal scarring.  After eight surgeries this is kind of crazy.  His surgeon says Zack’s body is magic.  We know that his body does not like ileostomies.  This is sad because when they work, he feels SO much better.  When they are not working, he feels so incredibly bad.  It is not normal for a person to prolapse this much.  What is the reason?  Nobody knows.

Do we do more testing on his colon to confirm if it works or not?  Do we check into the obstruction at the anastomosis again?  Do we throw in the towel and say take the colon out?  Will the small intestine, which keeps prolapsing as an ileostomy, man up and work as a colon or will it continue to be a pain in Zack’s…well…ass. Nobody knows.

If we decide to take his colon out and do a pull-through operation, it is a pretty big deal.  There are lots of things to consider and it does not magically make him better.  There is a long recovery period with a high risk of complications. So, again I ask, what do we do?

The time has come for Jim and me to make some tough decisions.  We do not have much time until Zack prolapses again and we do not want to have to put him through another emergency surgery.  The plan, for now, is to conference call with our GI and surgeon here and our GI and surgeon in Cincinnati and talk about all of our options.

In the meantime, we are in the middle of stoma hell again.  Zack’s new ileostomy is much larger than the others.  It is also closer to his staple line.  This make it hard to get a good seal on his bag, so it keeps leaking.  Yesterday and today we have gone through 5 bag changes per day.  His skin is raw and bloody.  Zack is convinced his staples are going to rip out of his tummy.  He is pretty mad that it hurts so much.  Today we saw a show with a little girl complaining that she scraped her knee and needed a Bandaid.  Zack said, “Oh, COME ON! She’s complaining because she scraped her knee?”  We may have to work on empathy…

That pretty much summarizes our last week.  Even though it was stinky, we were again blessed by everyone who helped Zack.  Our surgeon and his team, our GI doctor, Zack’s nurses and staff and our social worker.  If you have to be sick, it is nice to be in a place that truly wants the best for your child.

I leave you with a shout out to my family.  This Tuesday is our 25th anniversary.  They arranged for Jim and me to stay at a nice hotel near their house for two nights while they kept an eye on Zack.  We were exhausted from the hospital stay and considered backing out, but decided to give it a try.  Even though we had to go and take care of Zack’s wafer quite a few times, we were able to sleep for 10 hours straight the first night, go out for a nice dinner and spend some time without drama.  We did sign up for sickness and health after all.  Hopefully more healthy days will be coming our way soon.  So thanks family.  You rock!

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Hug your babies!

~ Dawn

 

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